2017 newsletters

Fall Newsletter

Oak Lawn Library Friends – Flash

Vol 6 Issue 2 – August 18th 2017

Day of Giving – September 14th, 2017

September 14, 2017 is a special day in North Texas when thousands of non-profits get together on one day to encourage contributions to their organization. This is managed by the Communities Foundation of Texas. It is the largest such event in the country.

The Oak Lawn Library Friends participates in this event every year. We use the funds raised from this day to support programming for adults and children during the coming fiscal year. It begins at 6 a.m. and runs thru midnight on September 14th. Donations can only be made online at:

https://northtexasgivingday.org . This year, we have $1000 in matching grants. So the first $1,000 donated this year will be doubled by matching grants by various businesses and individuals.

City Budget News

          For a change, the city budget news is good.   All branches that have only been open 5 days a week are adding another day of service with an addition of 8 hours starting in January.   Also ESL (English as a Second Language) classes will be added to 20 branches so that every library branch in the city will offer some ESL classes. This is vital in city where about half the population does not speak English at home.

Adult Programs for the fall

Novel discussion book club meets the 4th Wednesday at 11 a.m. starting in Sept. The September book will be “Moonlight over Paris” by Jennifer Robson.

Art classes for Adults start Oct. 3rd 6:30 p.m. and will run every Tuesday (for 8 weeks) thru Nov. 21st.

Sign Language lessons start Thursday Oct. 5th at 6:30 p.m. (for 10 weeks) thru Nov. 30th.

Children Programs for fall

Toddler Story Time starting Sept. 5th 11 a.m. every Tuesday.

“Kick Back” Saturdays starting Sept. 9th 3 p.m.

Book Pages

          Are you looking for new books to read, Book Pages is one of those sources. The Oak Lawn Library Friends (OLLF) has a subscription of 100 copies per month. If you have not picked up a copy, this is a great source of information on new books that are coming to our library soon.   I always check the library catalog when I get the Book Pages to reserve books that interest me.

Kroger Community Rewards Program

It’s easy to continue your support every time you shop and use your Shopper’s Card. Just login to Kroger.com/CommunityRewards and select the Oak Lawn Library Friends # is 41560. You need to renew your selection starting in August when you have to choose again. It does not increase your grocery bill but it does benefit the library. Last quarter, Kroger shoppers generated over $70 for the Oak Lawn Library.

Upcoming Art Shows for the rest of 2017

September – Ron Radawanski

October – Annual Juried Art Show

November – Philmore Peterson

December – Kasie Tunison

OLLF 11th Annual Art Show

The OLLF 11th Annual Art Show starts on Oct. 1st.   Artists may bring their art to hang on Saturday Sept. 30 from 2 – 4 p.m.   The show is open to artists 18 & up.   Artists may enter 3 pieces of art in the show.   Art will be judged and ribbons awarded for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place. There is no cost to enter the show.

 

Art for 2018

If you are an artist, you may sign up to display your art in the library for an entire month during 2018 except for October which is reserved for the annual art show.   If you wish to display your art, contact Stan Aten at s.aten@att.net.

Tom Thumb Good Neighbor Rewards

If you shop at Tom Thumb, you can link your Tom Thumb Rewards card with Good Neighbor Charity #2923. OLLF will get 1% of money you spend at Tom Thumb. For more information, visit Tom Thumb’s Good Neighbor Program webpage.

Join the Oak Lawn Library Friends

Why the Friends?

The Oak Lawn Library Friends was formed to assist the branch in meeting the needs of all its patrons. The Friends actively support the branch by:

  • Encouraging donations and volunteering
  • Organizing and hosting programs and special events
  • Volunteering at the direction of the branch manager
  • Publicizing OLLF activities to the media and patrons
  • Advocating for the branch and the Dallas Public Library system

 

Membership levels are:             Student/Senior Citizen: $6                           Sustaining: $20

Household: $25

Close Friend: $75                                              Corporate: $250

Memorial/Other Contribution: Open amount

  • If paying by check, please make it payable to: Oak Lawn Library Friends (OLLF).
  • Visit our new webpage: http://oaklawnlibrarydallas.com for information on how to become a member.

Suggested Books to read this fall

As they days grow shorter and the weather gets colder, it is the perfect time to stop by the library to get some new books or read some classics.   Here are some suggestions of non-fiction and fiction books currently available in the Dallas Public Library.

Non-fiction

The Lowells of Massachusetts by Nina Sankovitch.   This is a family history of the Lowells from the time of Charles 1st until the mid-20th century.   This family included famous preachers, businessmen, writers, poets and astronomers. Francis Cabot Lowell brought textile mills and factories to America in the 1800’s.   Percival Lowell built an observatory in Arizona in 1894.   He was looking to prove that there was life on Mars. Amy Lowell was a famous Lesbian poet in the early 20th century.   These are a just a few of the individuals from this famous family.

Urban Forests by Jill Jones. This book is a natural history of trees in the American city from 1850 to the present.   It describes the efforts to save trees from pests both insect and human.   Many of the diseases impacting the urban forest are due to imported goods that were not fumigated properly before entering the US.   People have always understood the importance of trees but today software has been created to calculate the financial and environmental value of trees. It is a great book to read if you love trees.

New York by Edward Rutherford.  This is a  history of families living in New York from the 1650’s until 2009. It is written in the style of James Michener.  It focuses on the people who settle and then transform New Amsterdam and later New York from a wild island with a great harbor into the largest city in America.

As the history progresses, familiar names become places that is a part of everyday knowledge.   It helps to broaden an understanding of how the island of Manhattan and the city of New York developed over time.

 

The Bridge Builder by Vivian Anderson Castleberry. This is a biography of Sarah Cockrell. Sarah was one of the early pioneers of Dallas County who moved to the area with her family of 10 brothers and sisters to a farm in the Mountain Creek area in the early 1840’s. When her family arrived in the area, downtown Dallas consisted of two buildings.

She married later in life to Alexander Cockrell.   They became business partners as well as being a married couple.   They owned the first office building in Dallas, the first hotel, a ferry, a toll bridge; saw mill, brick yard and grist mill.

Her husband was killed by the town marshal in the 1850’s. After that date, Sarah had to assume control of the business. Because she was a woman, at a time when women had limited rights, she had to use other people to be the public face of her business empire.

She was the first millionaire in Dallas and the state of Texas.   She died in 1892 and her family still plays an important part in Dallas today.

Fiction

Goodnight from London by Jennifer Robson. A young American female journalist is given the opportunity of a life time, a job at weekly magazine in London during WW2. She seizes the opportunity and learns what it is like to live in a city while at war. She survives food shortages, the Blitz and the waiting to see what will be the outcome of the fighting.   A well written book that is a quick read.

Change Agent by Daniel Suarez. The year is 2045 and humanity has the ability to edit human DNA in embryos. The UN has a law that limits what changes are permitted and Kenneth Durand is a data analysis person with Interpol who helps fight companies that sell illegal DNA changes.   This novel takes us to a world where most manufactured items are grown by biologic processes and DNA editing is a vast industry.   It may sound farfetched but many of the ideas are already being explored by scientists today.   The ultimate question in the book becomes how can you identify a person when they can have their DNA altered?

Search the Dark by Charles Todd.   The third of a series of Inspector Rutledge murder mysteries.   This novel starts with a man down on his luck taking a train trip to a potential job. On the way, he sees a woman and two children at a station whom he thinks are his family who were reported to have died during a Zeppelin raid in 1916.   He can’t get off in time and has to return.    When he gets back to the station, the woman and children are missing.

He frantically searches the village but without success.   Two days later a body of a woman is discovered and he is accused of the murder.   Inspector Rutledge is called in to find the children and unravel the mystery of the dead woman.

Summer Newsletter

Oak Lawn Library Friends – Flash

Vol 6 Issue 1 – April 10th 2017

Spring Fling April 25th 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

          Oak Lawn Library Friends (OLLF) will hold a “Spring Fling/Customer Appreciation Mixer” on Tuesday, April 25th from 5:30 – 7:00 p.m. at Zephyr’s Restaurant, 4001 Cedar Springs Road.   There will be light appetizers at this event and a cash bar.   There will be drawings for raffle prizes during this event.

This is the first membership recruitment event as OLLF embarks on a campaign to increase membership and awareness of the work we do for the library.

Jeff Thiebeault, membership chairman, encourages all members to bring a guest as a prospective member.   Thiebeault indicates that he would like to see OLLF double the membership in the next year.

The mixer has also been dubbed an “appreciation night” to thank those folks who use the Oak Lawn Library’s services and programs. Staff from the library will be on hand to answer any questions.

OLLF President, Stan Aten, will deliver some brief remarks about OLLF and the future of the Dallas Public Library.

For more information about this event, contact Jeff Thiebeault @ 214-962-2566.

 

Upcoming changes to programs at the Oak Lawn Library.

Sign Classes to offer two sessions this summer:

Signing Social (American Sign Language classes) will take a break in mid-April but will resume at the Oak Lawn Library starting Thursday May 4th.

Session 1 will run from May 4th to June 22nd on Thursday 6:30p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Session 2 will run from July 13th – August 31st on Thursday, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

To sign-up for the program email: oaklawn@dallaslibrary.org

Adult Art Classes go monthly for the summer.

Art Lessons for adults will be held once a month on Tuesdays during the summer on the following dates: June 13th, July 11th, and August 8th, 6:30pm. To sign-up for the program email: oaklawn@dallaslibrary.org

Art Classes at the Reverchon Rec. Center

The Oak Lawn Library & Reverchon Recreational Center collaborated to provide Art Lessons for seniors as part of the Reverchon Senior Club.

Art Lessons will be held at the Reverchon Recreational Center, Thursdays, 11:00am, April 6-May 25. For more information please contact the Reverchon Recreational Center 214-670-7720.

Mayor’s Summer Reading Club – starts June 3rd

The Mayor’s Summer Reading Club officially kicks off on June 3. Childrens and adults will be able to sign up and earn prized for reading. The Oak Lawn Library will host several programs each week during the summer. For more information email: oaklawn@dallaslibrary.org

Staff creates new displays

Come check out the cool displays the Oak Lawn Library staff have created. Let the staff know which one you like the best….

Book Pages

          Are you looking for new books to read, Book Pages is one of those sources. The Oak Lawn Library Friends (OLLF) had been paying for a subscription of 50 copies per month; however, the library was running out well before the end of the month.      Therefore, OLLF has increased the number of copies to 100 starting in November.   If you have not picked up a copy, this is a great source of information on new books that are coming to your library soon.   I always check the library catalog when I get the Book Pages to reserve books that interest me.

Kroger Community Rewards Program

It’s easy to continue your support every time you shop and use your Shopper’s Card. Just login to Kroger.com/CommunityRewards and select the Oak Lawn Library Friends # is 41560. Your selection is good until August when you have to choose again. It does not increase your grocery bill but it does benefit the library.

Upcoming Art Shows 2017

April – Gina Benson

May – Kate Cornwall

June – Nona

Dallas Public Library – mobile app

Did you know the Dallas Public Library has a new mobile app? You can download the Dallas Public Library app for Android or Apple phones.   It allows you to access your account, order materials or renew your materials from your phone. It is a handy tool when you are on the go and don’t have access to a personal computer.

Tom Thumb Good Neighbor Rewards

If you shop at Tom Thumb, you can link your Tom Thumb Rewards card with Good Neighbor Charity #2923. OLLF will get 1% of money you spend at Tom Thumb. For more information, visit Tom Thumb’s Good Neighbor Program webage.

Visit our new webpage: http://oaklawnlibrarydallas.com for information on how to become a member.

Join the Oak Lawn Library Friends

 

Why the Friends?

The Oak Lawn Library Friends was formed to assist the branch in meeting the needs of all its patrons. The Friends actively support the branch by:

  • Encouraging donations and volunteering
  • Organizing and hosting programs and special events
  • Volunteering at the direction of the branch manager
  • Publicizing OLLF activities to the media and patrons
  • Advocating for the branch and the Dallas Public Library system

 

Membership levels are:             Student/Senior Citizen: $6                           Sustaining: $20

Household: $25

Close Friend: $75                                              Corporate: $250

Memorial/Other Contribution: Open amount

  • If paying by check, please make it payable to: Oak Lawn Library Friends (OLLF).

 

 

 

Suggested Books to read this Spring

As they days grow longer and the weather gets warmer, it is the perfect time to stop by the library to get some new books or read some classics.   Here are some suggestions of non-fiction and fiction books currently available in the Dallas Public Library.

Non-fiction

This Time is Different by Carmen R. Reinhart & Kenneth Rogoff – This is a financial history of the pasts 800 years of countries that have defaulted on their debt.   It covers everything from reducing the metal content when coins were silver or gold, to rescheduling debt, just not paying debt or keeping interest rates artificially low.

The most valuable part of this book are the charts which document the impact on the average person thru reduced economic growth and higher unemployment while the government works to resolve the debt they owe.

It only covers thru 2010 so it does not have a complete accounting of the latest financial crisis which started in 2007.

 

Ike’s Bluff by Evan Thomas – this book is a biography covering only the period of General Eisenhower’s presidency.   To a lot of people when I was growing up, Eisenhower was considered a very dull president.   After reading this book, I have to reevaluate my thoughts about his presidency.   He was quite smart but he was also a good poker player, a skill he developed while in the Army.

When he was elected as a Republican in 1952, he had to deal with a political party that had been out of power for 20 years.   They were also factions within the party who wanted the US to stay out of foreign adventures.

Eisenhower had to always deal with a tricky balance of keeping the peace while being aware of Russia possessing nuclear weapons.   He had a secret which he kept until 1961 which was the U2 spy plane which allowed him to know exactly what the Russian military had as far as weapons. He was accused by his opponents of not protecting the US from the Russians by underfunding the military.

As a former general, he knew how wasteful military spending could be and the cost to society in general when money was spent on weapons instead of schools, roads or other govt. programs.

He also was skilled at manipulating other politicians to keep his opponents off balance. I was surprised at poor his health was during his presidency with several heart attacks and other serious illnesses while president. I would recommend this book for anyone wanting to know more about the 1950’s.

 

Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance – A memoir of life in Kentucky and Ohio in the late 1980’s to the present. This is a troubling look at life in modern America where drinking, smoking and single parent families are the norm.

The author bounces from mother to grandmother and back again as he tries to grow up and make something of his life. He finally finds his hope thru joining the Marines.   After he completes his service he goes to university and eventually Yale Law School.

He blames the underlying culture for the problems his region of the country is facing now that all the blue collar jobs are gone.

 

Fiction

Among the Mad by Jacqueline Winspear This 6th novel in the Masie Dobbs series is set in December 1931.   Masie is confronted with a mad man who is using his knowledge of poison gases to injure and possibly kill the public.   This novel turns into an exploration of the British government’s war efforts to use scientists and human test subjects to find antidotes and new more deadly gas weapons to counter the Germans use of poison gas on the Western Front.   It also explores the question of how far a government agency will go to bend the rules of law to protect the greater good. This is another well written novel about the long-term impact of war on a population.

The Dime by Kathleen Kent.

 

This novel expands a short story that first appeared in “Dallas Noir” which involved drug dealers and Civil War Reenactors.   In the novel a New York lesbian policewoman from Brooklyn, with a family history of service in the NY Police department and a Polish ancestry, has transferred to the Dallas Police Department.   As the novel begins, she is on a stakeout waiting for a drug dealer to appear when the stakeout goes wrong and several people are killed. Then the story goes crazy with competing drug gangs, dead bodies, headless bodies and more. A very fast paced police thriller set in modern day Texas.